Get Yourself Some Swag

You all have been so great with supporting Take Out Plastic, and many of you have asked when we will be getting merch!

 

So we are very excited to announce *drumroll* the launch of our Take Out Plastic Upcycled swag. (WTF is that?!) Well, it works a bit like a BYO, you provide us with one of your pre-loved shirts, sweaters, hoodies, tote bag, and we'll print our rad graphic and logo on it!

How it works:

  1. Find a time to drop off a pre-loved plain sweater, shirt or tote bag with Jayme. *Even better, come to our Swop event on Monday 29th!

  2. Pick one of the options for printing eg. logo on front, print on back (see our swag catalogue below)

  3. Contact us to arrange a collection.

  4. We'll take that shirt to get printed with our graphic design and logo.

  5. Pay what you want! (ahem well, at least $150 to cover costs)

  6. Due to the use of different fabrics, we can't guarantee perfection on the print...but we'll try to get pretty darn close.
     

*All money donated will go to support Take Out Plastics efforts to reduce plastic in Hong Kong.

Don't have something to print?

No stress. We've also been collecting items from charity shops around Hong Kong and have been looking into partnering with brands to buy their dead stock.

Why upcycling?

An average of 110,000 tonnes of disposed of garments is collected in Hong Kong each year, which equals a rate of 1,400 T-shirts per minute. We want to make sure clothes don't end up in landfills, so giving them new life was a no-brainer!

 

We decided it would be a waste of the planet's resources to start something from scratch or even make something from recycled plastics. So upcycling clothes is the most sustainable way for us to bring you Take Out Plastic gear.

The printing:

Our friends at Print House will be digitally printing the graphic. Going digital uses less energy, produces less waste, and has a smaller carbon footprint overall.

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The Graphic and its story:

She didn’t believe it, of course.

Everyone knows you can’t believe what you read on the Internet.

To-Go Container Delivers More than Bargained For.

She clicked the link, but only read the first paragraph. Some man claimed a to-go container somehow flooded his apartment. The image showed the damage-- the ruined furniture and the garbage. This man must’ve been living in a dump. She, on the other hand, kept her apartment spotless. She kept her green latex dish gloves out visible by the sink. 

The doorbell rang. Her food had arrived.

She checked the contents of the plastic bag: a Styrofoam to-go box, her plastic utensils in their plastic wrappers, and a small bottle of water.

She took the Styrofoam box from the plastic bag, she took the plastic utensils from their plastic wrapper, and she poured the water from the plastic bottle into her favorite cup. She gathered the plastic into a pile and threw it in the garbage can. But wait--had something moved? The to-go box. She’d heard it squeak against the table and saw it shift out of the corner of her eye. Against her better judgement, she lifted the lid. 

First came the water, burbling up nearly black, ice cold and salty. She stepped away and watched in horror as a tentacle reached up nearly to the ceiling before slapping down onto the table. Soon, an octopus the size of a taxi cab had pulled itself up from her to-go box and settled in her kitchen. 

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The fountain of black water became choked with plastic that spilled out over the table--bottles, baggies, straws, forks and knives, wrappers and more torn unrecognizable bits. An impossible amount, and yet she knew that it was all her own.

 

The octopus’s tentacles were splayed out across her kitchen wall, feeling and exploring. One tentacle whipped out, and something green came flying through the air toward her. Reflexively, she caught the object. Her green latex dish gloves she kept by the sink.

 

When she looked up, the water had drained and the octopus had gone, but the plastic remained. She nodded and sighed, then put on her gloves and began to clean up her mess and get it ready for recycling.